The True Meaning of Christmas

As a kid, it’s hard to see the big, wide world outside your own tiny bubble of existence.  (Heck, it’s not easy even as an adult sometimes!)  That’s why I’ve made it my mission to try to teach my kids to help out people in need.  And one of my favorite holiday traditions for our family is to help fulfill the Christmas wish list of a child in need.

For the past five years, my twins and I have selected a boy and a girl from the elementary school’s Sharing Committee who have provided a list of things he/she “needs” and “wants“.  And every year, my husband and I sit our own kids down and explain to them that not every mom and dad is able to buy a bunch of presents at Christmas.  We remind them that we are not the richest, nor are we the poorest of their friends,  but we can certainly do what we can to make someone’s holiday a little brighter.

So as a family, we all pile into the car and head to Target on a very special shopping excursion.  Sure, my kids often get distracted by all the flashing/talking/blinking toys that they want for themselves, but in the end, we come home with a bundle of goodies for somebody else’s kids that have been hand-picked by both my daughter and my son.  It amazes me every time how involved they get with the selection process of the gifts!

Now, I don’t know for sure how meaningful this tradition is to them just yet, but for me, it is the true meaning of Christmas.  I look so forward to creating this memory each and every year.  And I only hope and pray that my kids CHOOSE to do it with their own families one day….

 

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6 Responses to The True Meaning of Christmas

  1. cara says:

    I love this! We always take a star off the giving tree and do the same. When my kids give me their wish list for Christmas they must also give me one item from their room for every item on their list that they no longer want/use. It can be clothes that don’t fit, toy’s that don’t get played with but for every item on their list they must give me one item. We then take all those items and donate them locally. (kills 2 birds with one stone – teaches them about other children that don’t have everything they want and cleans their rooms out so I don’t have to do it! LOL)

  2. Joseph V says:

    Love it! Great idea.

  3. This is a great idea. I’m looking for something to do with my 3yr old this year to show him that Christmas isn’t all about him getting presents. That it’s about giving and sharing with those in need.

  4. Dolli says:

    Allow this pastor’s wife to get all preachy: don’t forget it’s all about Jesus! :-)

  5. lisa says:

    Loved your blog. The kids are GORGEOUS! I love your way of teaching your children to give…you receive so much in return! I remember one year, many years ago… I suggested that we take our “christmas bucks” and give it to a family who can’t afford a tree or presents or food. My son ran to his room and made a big bag of toys. My daughter..ahem, broke down on the floor and wept! LOL! She cried and mourned for her huge pile of presents! She finally calmed down and asked me in the sweetest voice. Mommy, I am sorry for crying but can I keep just ONE toy for myself for Christmas! She thought I was going to clean out her toyroom and give it all away! I told her she could pick and choose what she wanted to give to another child who had no toys. She packed up a bag of toys and inside was a small pink blanket. She told me this is for the little girl to keep warm. She warmed my heart that Christmas and 20 years later, she still does. Merry Christmas & God Bless you ~ lisa

    • nuckingfutsmama says:

      That sweet story totally brought a big smile to my face! Thanks so much for sharing! Happy holidays to you & your family!!! xo :)

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